Support your Children by Keeping it Civil on the Sidelines

You can picture them now: overzealous parents who stand on the sidelines and berate the refs, the opposing team, sometimes even their children’s coach and teammates.  Things can sometimes get animated when it comes to youth sports.  Even the most reserved parents sometimes can’t help but shout from the sidelines when there’s a questionable whistle blown or an exciting goal scored.  In the United States, parents rooting on from the sideline has become a large part of youth sports for better or for worse.  The children who are competing can even become used to it and tune it out when they’re in the zone.  But there’s a different kind of shouting that sometimes goes on at youth sports that’s impossible for a kid to tune out; that is, shouting that goes on between divorced spouses.

It’s important that after a separation or divorce both parents attend their children’s activities whether it’s a dance recital, hockey tournament, art exhibition, or school field day.  These activities are a great opportunity to show your children that you love and support them not just during your own custodial time.  From the parents’ perspective, it’s a great chance to see your son or daughter on a day when you might not otherwise get to.  However nothing can turn this positive experience upside down faster and with more of an impact than when two parents who are separated or divorced start bickering or even shouting at one another over issues related to their marriage and/or divorce.

If you and your spouse can’t seem to set down your differences for 90 minutes and instead focus on supporting your children, you can avoid conflict by standing on different sidelines, staggering your arrivals and departures, or alternating who will attend which event.  Your child will benefit from having both parents there to support them, but only if you can remain civil and avoid making disparaging remarks to one another.

To schedule an appointment with one of our attorneys or for further information, call us at the LaMonaca Law, at (610) 892-3877

About the author

About Christopher Casserly

Christopher Casserly graduated from Providence College in Providence, RI where he was a double major in English and French. After college Mr. Casserly went on to receive his Juris Doctorate from Villanova University School of Law in Villanova, PA. While in law school Mr. Casserly focused his studies on Family Law and participated in the Villanova Law Civil Justice Clinic where he advocated for indigent clients facing custody issues. Mr. Casserly is a member of the American Bar Association Family Law Section, the Pennsylvania Bar Association, the Delaware County Bar Association, and the Philadelphia Bar Association Young Lawyers Division.

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